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nihilist - 19 / 05 / 2022

Anonymous self-hosted clearnet mail server Setup

In this tutorial we will setup a local mail server (to be able to keep control of our data), we will make it available publicly (so that it can communicate with other mail servers), but we'll make it go through TOR to guarantee Anonymity.

Note that this setup involves self-hosting, which I do not recommend if the service is supposed to be sensitive. If this is an issue for you, just install it on a non-KYC remote VPS and skip the port-forwarding part if you don't want to host it at your house.

Initial VPN over Tor Setup

First let's make it use an external VPS as a VPN server (make sure that you get it from a non-KYC cloud provider, where you create your account with an email that you also registered through TOR.), see this tutorial i made for the full reasoning.


root@mail:~# apt update -y ; apt upgrade -y ; apt autoremove -y ; apt install vim tor obfs4proxy -y
	

Then we need to have the systemd services:


root@mail:~# vim /etc/systemd/system/tortables.service                                                                                                                                                                                      
root@mail:~# vim /etc/systemd/system/torwatch.service
root@mail:~# vim /etc/systemd/system/vpn.service                                                                                                                                                                                            
root@mail:~# vim /etc/systemd/system/sshtunnel.service
	

The tortables systemd service will run iptables to make sure our server only communicates locally:


root@mail:~# cat /etc/systemd/system/tortables.service
[Unit]
Description=Tor IP Tables
After=network-online.target
Wants=network-online.target

[Service]
Type=simple
ExecStart=/root/iptables_vpn_tor.sh

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target
	
root@mail:~# vim iptables_vpn_tor.sh
root@mail:~# cat iptables_vpn_tor.sh
#!/bin/bash


#default private networks
sudo iptables -F

sudo iptables -A INPUT -m iprange --src-range 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255 -j ACCEPT
sudo iptables -A INPUT -m iprange --src-range 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255 -j ACCEPT
sudo iptables -A INPUT -m iprange --src-range 10.0.0.0-10.255.255.255 -j ACCEPT
sudo iptables -A INPUT -m iprange --src-range 127.0.0.0-127.255.255.255 -j ACCEPT

sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -m iprange --dst-range 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255 -j ACCEPT
sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -m iprange --dst-range 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255 -j ACCEPT
sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -m iprange --dst-range 10.0.0.0-10.255.255.255 -j ACCEPT
sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -m iprange --dst-range 127.0.0.0-127.255.255.255 -j ACCEPT

#ip range of tor VPN:

sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -o tun0 -j ACCEPT
sudo iptables -A INPUT -i tun0 -j ACCEPT

sudo iptables -A INPUT -j DROP
sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -j DROP

The torwatch systemd service will make sure the tor connection is still up:


root@mail:~# cat /etc/systemd/system/torwatch.service
[Unit]
Description=torwatcher
After=network-online.target
Wants=network-online.target

[Service]
Type=simple
ExecStart=/root/monitor_tor.sh
ExecStop=kill -9 $(pidof /root/monitor_tor.sh)
Restart=always

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target
root@mail:~# vim monitor_tor.sh
root@mail:~# cat monitor_tor.sh
#!/bin/bash

counter=0
while true; do
        echo TESTING
        timeout 10 ping -c1 10.8.0.1 &>/dev/null
        if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
                echo OK;
                sleep 3
        else
                if [ $counter -gt 0 ];
                then
                        echo 'RESTARTING TOR...'
                        systemctl restart tor@default
                        counter=0
                        sleep 10
                else
                        counter=$((counter+1))
                        echo "FAIL ( $counter / 2)";
                        sleep 3
                fi
        fi
done
	

But as you can see it checks it by pinging 10.8.0.1, the OpenVPN server IP, meaning we need the vpn systemd service:


root@mail:~# cat /etc/systemd/system/vpn.service
[Unit]
Description=VPN
After=network-online.target
Wants=network-online.target

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

[Service]
Type=simple
ExecStart=/usr/sbin/openvpn /root/mail.ovpn
ExecStop=kill -9 $(pidof openvpn)
Restart=always

root@mail:~# apt install openvpn -y
	

Then we get the .ovpn file and modify it (if you want to see how to make a openvpn server, see it here) the only requirement here is that you will need to setup the openvpn server to work on TCP, and not UDP as it is set by default. Why? because it will need to go through tor:


root@mail:~# vim mail.ovpn
root@mail:~# cat mail.ovpn
client
proto tcp-client
remote x.x.x.x 1194
dev tun
resolv-retry infinite
nobind
persist-key
persist-tun
remote-cert-tls server
verify-x509-name server_6SQ8FnOk0eJa3n0F name
auth SHA256
auth-nocache
cipher AES-128-GCM
tls-client
tls-version-min 1.2
tls-cipher TLS-ECDHE-ECDSA-WITH-AES-128-GCM-SHA256
ignore-unknown-option block-outside-dns
setenv opt block-outside-dns # Prevent Windows 10 DNS leak
verb 3

### TOR SETTINGS ###
socks-proxy 127.0.0.1 9050
socks-proxy-retry
up-delay
route 10.0.0.195 255.255.255.255 net_gateway
###################

This will essentially force the openvpn connection to go through TOR, then we also edit our /etc/tor/torrc file, note that i intentionally route the traffic through a local bridge node, if you want to know how to set it up, please check this tutorial:


root@mail-nihilism:~# cat /etc/tor/torrc
UseBridges 1
ClientTransportPlugin obfs4 exec /usr/bin/obfs4proxy
Bridge obfs4 10.0.1.195:8042 6E9324EC8317DE331DE1EA7969BD868136785748 cert=tyhAPcDxgIcuqcUXXxtkYVPKrWMH7bYf7RJcLa8d+oGbQjoYSK10g4Pz7a/dbJkMXLVvAA iat-mode=0
DataDirectory /var/lib/tor
TransPort 9040
SocksPort 9050
DNSPort 53
User debian-tor
	
root@mail:~# systemctl stop tor
root@mail:~# tor
May 15 12:00:17.068 [notice] Tor 0.3.5.16 running on Linux with Libevent 2.1.8-stable, OpenSSL 1.1.1n, Zlib 1.2.11, Liblzma 5.2.4, and Libzstd 1.3.8.
May 15 12:00:17.068 [notice] Tor can't help you if you use it wrong! Learn how to be safe at https://www.torproject.org/download/download#warning
May 15 12:00:17.068 [notice] Read configuration file "/etc/tor/torrc".
May 15 12:00:17.076 [notice] Opening Socks listener on 127.0.0.1:9050
May 15 12:00:17.076 [notice] Opened Socks listener on 127.0.0.1:9050
May 15 12:00:17.076 [notice] Opening DNS listener on 127.0.0.1:53
May 15 12:00:17.076 [notice] Opened DNS listener on 127.0.0.1:53
May 15 12:00:17.076 [notice] Opening Transparent pf/netfilter listener on 127.0.0.1:9040
May 15 12:00:17.076 [notice] Opened Transparent pf/netfilter listener on 127.0.0.1:9040
May 15 12:00:17.000 [notice] Parsing GEOIP IPv4 file /usr/share/tor/geoip.
May 15 12:00:17.000 [notice] Parsing GEOIP IPv6 file /usr/share/tor/geoip6.
May 15 12:00:17.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 0%: Starting
May 15 12:00:18.000 [notice] Starting with guard context "bridges"
May 15 12:00:18.000 [notice] new bridge descriptor 'voidyt' (cached): $2E73653A148DFFF3CA28D53F0C366936FE554335~voidyt at 10.0.0.195
May 15 12:00:18.000 [notice] Delaying directory fetches: Pluggable transport proxies still configuring
May 15 12:00:19.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 5%: Connecting to directory server
May 15 12:00:19.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 10%: Finishing handshake with directory server
May 15 12:00:19.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 80%: Connecting to the Tor network
May 15 12:00:19.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 90%: Establishing a Tor circuit
May 15 12:00:19.000 [notice] Bootstrapped 100%: Done

root@mail-nihilism:~# systemctl restart tor@default.service
root@mail-nihilism:~# systemctl status tor@default.service
● tor@default.service - Anonymizing overlay network for TCP
     Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/tor@default.service; enabled-runtime; vendor preset: enabled)
     Active: active (running) since Thu 2022-12-08 12:14:21 CST; 29s ago
    Process: 3515 ExecStartPre=/usr/bin/install -Z -m 02755 -o debian-tor -g debian-tor -d /run/tor (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
    Process: 3516 ExecStartPre=/usr/bin/tor --defaults-torrc /usr/share/tor/tor-service-defaults-torrc -f /etc/tor/torrc --RunAsDaemon 0 --verify-config (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
   Main PID: 3517 (tor)
      Tasks: 8 (limit: 4673)
     Memory: 25.7M
        CPU: 1.180s
     CGroup: /system.slice/system-tor.slice/tor@default.service
             ├─3517 /usr/bin/tor --defaults-torrc /usr/share/tor/tor-service-defaults-torrc -f /etc/tor/torrc --RunAsDaemon 0
             └─3518 /usr/bin/obfs4proxy

Dec 08 12:14:22 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Bootstrapped 1% (conn_pt): Connecting to pluggable transport
Dec 08 12:14:23 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Opening Control listener on /run/tor/control
Dec 08 12:14:23 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Opened Control listener connection (ready) on /run/tor/control
Dec 08 12:14:23 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Bootstrapped 2% (conn_done_pt): Connected to pluggable transport
Dec 08 12:14:23 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Bootstrapped 10% (conn_done): Connected to a relay
Dec 08 12:14:23 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Bootstrapped 14% (handshake): Handshaking with a relay
Dec 08 12:14:23 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Bootstrapped 15% (handshake_done): Handshake with a relay done
Dec 08 12:14:23 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Bootstrapped 75% (enough_dirinfo): Loaded enough directory info to build circuits
Dec 08 12:14:23 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Bootstrapped 95% (circuit_create): Establishing a Tor circuit
Dec 08 12:14:23 mail-nihilism Tor[3517]: Bootstrapped 100% (done): Done

Now that tor has been setup to use the local TOR relay, we apply iptable rules:


root@mail:~# ls
iptables_vpn_tor.sh  mail.ovpn  monitor_tor.sh
root@mail:~# chmod +x *.sh

root@mail:~# systemctl daemon-reload
root@mail-nihilism:~# systemctl enable --now tor@default.service tortables
Synchronizing state of tor.service with SysV service script with /lib/systemd/systemd-sysv-install.
Executing: /lib/systemd/systemd-sysv-install enable tor
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/tortables.service → /etc/systemd/system/tortables.service.
root@mail:~# iptables -L

Chain INPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere             source IP range 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere             source IP range 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere             source IP range 10.0.0.0-10.255.255.255
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere             source IP range 127.0.0.0-127.255.255.255
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere
DROP       all  --  anywhere             anywhere

Chain FORWARD (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT)
target     prot opt source               destination
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere             destination IP range 192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere             destination IP range 172.16.0.0-172.31.255.255
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere             destination IP range 10.0.0.0-10.255.255.255
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere             destination IP range 127.0.0.0-127.255.255.255
ACCEPT     all  --  anywhere             anywhere
DROP       all  --  anywhere             anywhere
	

And from there we can connect to the VPN server:


root@mail:~# systemctl enable --now vpn torwatch
Created symlink /etc/systemd/system/multi-user.target.wants/torwatch.service → /etc/systemd/system/torwatch.service.
root@mail:~# systemctl status vpn torwatch

root@mail:~# systemctl status vpn torwatch
● vpn.service - VPN
   Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/vpn.service; static; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Sun 2022-05-15 12:03:26 CEST; 18s ago
 Main PID: 3144 (openvpn)
    Tasks: 1 (limit: 2359)
   Memory: 1.5M
   CGroup: /system.slice/vpn.service
           └─3144 /usr/sbin/openvpn /root/mail.ovpn

May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 ROUTE_GATEWAY 10.0.0.1/255.255.0.0 IFACE=ens18 HWADDR=ee:b5:c9:3a:c3:fe
May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 TUN/TAP device tun0 opened
May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 TUN/TAP TX queue length set to 100
May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 /sbin/ip link set dev tun0 up mtu 1500
May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 /sbin/ip addr add dev tun0 10.8.0.2/24 broadcast 10.8.0.255
May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 /sbin/ip route add 127.0.0.1/32 via 10.0.0.1
May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 /sbin/ip route add 0.0.0.0/1 via 10.8.0.1
May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 /sbin/ip route add 128.0.0.0/1 via 10.8.0.1
May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 /sbin/ip route add 10.0.0.195/32 dev ens18
May 15 12:03:28 mail openvpn[3144]: Sun May 15 12:03:28 2022 Initialization Sequence Completed

● torwatch.service - torwatcher
   Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/torwatch.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
   Active: active (running) since Sun 2022-05-15 12:03:26 CEST; 18s ago
 Main PID: 3145 (monitor_tor.sh)
    Tasks: 2 (limit: 2359)
   Memory: 1.1M
   CGroup: /system.slice/torwatch.service
           ├─3145 /bin/bash /root/monitor_tor.sh
           └─3172 sleep 3

May 15 12:03:26 mail systemd[1]: Started torwatcher.
May 15 12:03:26 mail monitor_tor.sh[3145]: TESTING
May 15 12:03:36 mail monitor_tor.sh[3145]: FAIL ( 1 / 2)
May 15 12:03:39 mail monitor_tor.sh[3145]: TESTING
May 15 12:03:39 mail monitor_tor.sh[3145]: OK
May 15 12:03:42 mail monitor_tor.sh[3145]: TESTING
May 15 12:03:42 mail monitor_tor.sh[3145]: OK
	

And now our mail server uses the remote server as a VPN server, but only through TOR, meaning even if the VPS provider were to check the server logs, or the networking traffic, he would see that it all came from tor exit nodes, never from public ips.

Mail Server Setup



Then we setup the mail itself on the local mail VM which is now connected to the VPN:


root@mail:~# apt update -y ; apt upgrade -y ; apt install vim tmux curl certbot python3-certbot-nginx nginx  -y
	

Then we make sure that the ports are forwarded through the vpn connection:


#on the VPN server we forward the ports to the local VM via iptables:

root@mail-gw:~# cat iptables_forwardrules.sh
#!/bin/bash
iptables -A PREROUTING -t nat -i ens3 -p tcp -d 23.137.250.140 --dport 25 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.8.0.2:25
iptables -A PREROUTING -t nat -i ens3 -p tcp -d 23.137.250.140 --dport 80 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.8.0.2:80
iptables -A PREROUTING -t nat -i ens3 -p tcp -d 23.137.250.140 --dport 443 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.8.0.2:443
iptables -A PREROUTING -t nat -i ens3 -p tcp -d 23.137.250.140 --dport 143 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.8.0.2:143
iptables -A PREROUTING -t nat -i ens3 -p tcp -d 23.137.250.140 --dport 465 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.8.0.2:465
iptables -A PREROUTING -t nat -i ens3 -p tcp -d 23.137.250.140 --dport 587 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.8.0.2:587
iptables -A PREROUTING -t nat -i ens3 -p tcp -d 23.137.250.140 --dport 993 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.8.0.2:993

root@mail:~# chmod +x iptables_forwardrules.sh
root@mail:~# ./iptables_forwardrules.sh

#from the VM we allow the packets to be forwarded to us:

root@mail-nihilism:~# cat iptables_forwardrules.sh
#!/bin/bash
iptables -A FORWARD -p tcp -d 10.8.0.2 --dport 25 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A FORWARD -p tcp -d 10.8.0.2 --dport 143 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A FORWARD -p tcp -d 10.8.0.2 --dport 465 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A FORWARD -p tcp -d 10.8.0.2 --dport 587 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A FORWARD -p tcp -d 10.8.0.2 --dport 993 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A FORWARD -p tcp -d 10.8.0.2 --dport 443 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A FORWARD -p tcp -d 10.8.0.2 --dport 80 -j ACCEPT

root@mail-nihilism:~# chmod +x iptables_forwardrules.sh
root@mail-nihilism:~# ./iptables_forwardrules.sh

Dont forget to allow ip forwarding on the vpn server:


root@mail-gw:~# sysctl net.ipv4.conf.ens3.forwarding=1
net.ipv4.conf.ens3.forwarding = 1
root@mail-gw:~# sysctl net.ipv6.conf.ens3.forwarding=1
net.ipv6.conf.ens3.forwarding = 1
root@mail-gw:~# echo " net.ipv6.conf.ens3.forwarding=1" >>/etc/sysctl.conf
root@mail-gw:~# echo " net.ipv4.conf.ens3.forwarding=1" >>/etc/sysctl.conf
root@mail-gw:~# sysctl -p
net.ipv6.conf.ens3.forwarding = 1
net.ipv4.conf.ens3.forwarding = 1

#for arch users, install libvirt:
sudo pacman -S libvirt
vim /etc/sysctl.d/30-ipforward.conf
cat /etc/sysctl.d/30-ipforward.conf
net.ipv4.ip_forward=1
net.ipv6.conf.default.forwarding=1
net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding=1

[ nihilism ] [ /dev/pts/1 ] [~]
→ sysctl net.ipv4.ip_forward=1
net.ipv4.ip_forward = 1

Then you make sure that your DNS records are set properly:

example of the record on a bind9 server:


root@mail-gw:~# cat /var/cache/bind/db.nihilism.network 

mail.nihilism.network.                  IN A       23.137.250.140

Then wait for it to propagate:


root@mail-nihilism:~# curl ifconfig.me
23.137.250.140root@mail-nihilism:~#
root@mail-nihilism:~# curl ifconfig.me ; echo
23.137.250.140
root@mail-nihilism:~# ping mail.nihilism.network
PING mail.nihilism.network (23.137.250.140) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 23.137.250.140 (23.137.250.140): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=160 ms

--- mail.nihilism.network ping statistics ---
2 packets transmitted, 1 received, 50% packet loss, time 1001ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 160.031/160.031/160.031/0.000 ms
root@mail-nihilism:~# ping nihilism.network
PING nihilism.network (23.137.250.141) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 23.137.250.141 (23.137.250.141): icmp_seq=1 ttl=63 time=204 ms

Once that's done we prepare nginx on the local VM still:


root@mail-nihilism:~# rm /etc/nginx/sites-*/default

root@mail-nihilism:~# cat /etc/nginx/sites-available/mail.nihilism.network.conf
server {
        listen 80;
        listen [::]:80;
        root /var/www/mail;

        index index.html;

        server_name mail.nihilism.network;

        location / {
                try_files $uri $uri/ =404;
        }
}

root@mail-nihilism:~# ln -s /etc/nginx/sites-available/mail.nihilism.network.conf /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/

root@mail-nihilism:~# systemctl restart nginx
root@mail-nihilism:~# systemctl status nginx
● nginx.service - A high performance web server and a reverse proxy server
     Loaded: loaded (/lib/systemd/system/nginx.service; enabled; vendor preset: enabled)
     Active: active (running) since Thu 2022-12-08 13:18:14 CST; 19s ago
       Docs: man:nginx(8)
    Process: 5903 ExecStartPre=/usr/sbin/nginx -t -q -g daemon on; master_process on; (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
    Process: 5904 ExecStart=/usr/sbin/nginx -g daemon on; master_process on; (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
   Main PID: 5905 (nginx)
      Tasks: 3 (limit: 4673)
     Memory: 3.2M
        CPU: 49ms
     CGroup: /system.slice/nginx.service
             ├─5905 nginx: master process /usr/sbin/nginx -g daemon on; master_process on;
             ├─5906 nginx: worker process
             └─5907 nginx: worker process

Dec 08 13:18:14 mail-nihilism systemd[1]: Starting A high performance web server and a reverse proxy server...
Dec 08 13:18:14 mail-nihilism systemd[1]: Started A high performance web server and a reverse proxy server.

root@mail-nihilism:~# mkdir -p /var/www/mail/
root@mail-nihilism:~# echo 'Nihilism Network' > /var/www/mail/index.html
root@mail-nihilism:~# curl 127.0.0.1
Nihilism Network
root@mail-nihilism:~# ip a | grep inet
    inet 127.0.0.1/8 scope host lo
    inet6 ::1/128 scope host
    inet 10.0.0.203/16 brd 10.0.255.255 scope global dynamic ens18
    inet6 fe80::e4e7:41ff:fe70:e9a6/64 scope link
    inet 10.8.0.2/24 scope global tun0
    inet6 fe80::18b1:efc9:1ae0:d93f/64 scope link stable-privacy

#from the vpn server:
root@mail-gw:~# curl 10.8.0.2
Nihilism Network

Now that's done we use certbot to get certificate from the local mail server:


root@mail-nihilism:~# certbot --nginx
Saving debug log to /var/log/letsencrypt/letsencrypt.log
Plugins selected: Authenticator nginx, Installer nginx
Enter email address (used for urgent renewal and security notices)
 (Enter 'c' to cancel): nihilist@nihilism.network

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Please read the Terms of Service at
https://letsencrypt.org/documents/LE-SA-v1.3-September-21-2022.pdf. You must
agree in order to register with the ACME server. Do you agree?
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
(Y)es/(N)o: Y

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Would you be willing, once your first certificate is successfully issued, to
share your email address with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a founding
partner of the Let's Encrypt project and the non-profit organization that
develops Certbot? We'd like to send you email about our work encrypting the web,
EFF news, campaigns, and ways to support digital freedom.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
(Y)es/(N)o: N
Account registered.

Which names would you like to activate HTTPS for?
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
1: mail.nihilism.network
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Select the appropriate numbers separated by commas and/or spaces, or leave input
blank to select all options shown (Enter 'c' to cancel):
Requesting a certificate for mail.nihilism.network
Performing the following challenges:
http-01 challenge for mail.nihilism.network
Waiting for verification...
Cleaning up challenges
Deploying Certificate to VirtualHost /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/mail.nihilism.network.conf
Redirecting all traffic on port 80 to ssl in /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/mail.nihilism.network.conf

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Congratulations! You have successfully enabled https://mail.nihilism.network
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

IMPORTANT NOTES:
 - Congratulations! Your certificate and chain have been saved at:
   /etc/letsencrypt/live/mail.nihilism.network/fullchain.pem
   Your key file has been saved at:
   /etc/letsencrypt/live/mail.nihilism.network/privkey.pem
   Your certificate will expire on 2023-03-08. To obtain a new or
   tweaked version of this certificate in the future, simply run
   certbot again with the "certonly" option. To non-interactively
   renew *all* of your certificates, run "certbot renew"
 - If you like Certbot, please consider supporting our work by:

   Donating to ISRG / Let's Encrypt:   https://letsencrypt.org/donate
   Donating to EFF:                    https://eff.org/donate-le

root@mail-nihilism:~# cat /etc/nginx/sites-available/mail.nihilism.network.conf
server {
        root /var/www/mail;

        index index.html;

        server_name mail.nihilism.network;

        location / {
                try_files $uri $uri/ =404;
        }

    listen [::]:443 ssl ipv6only=on; # managed by Certbot
    listen 443 ssl; # managed by Certbot
    ssl_certificate /etc/letsencrypt/live/mail.nihilism.network/fullchain.pem; # managed by Certbot
    ssl_certificate_key /etc/letsencrypt/live/mail.nihilism.network/privkey.pem; # managed by Certbot
    include /etc/letsencrypt/options-ssl-nginx.conf; # managed by Certbot
    ssl_dhparam /etc/letsencrypt/ssl-dhparams.pem; # managed by Certbot

}

server {
    if ($host = mail.nihilism.network) {
        return 301 https://$host$request_uri;
    } # managed by Certbot


        listen 80;
        listen [::]:80;

        server_name mail.nihilism.network;
    return 404; # managed by Certbot

And that's it! Now we can proceed with creating the mail server locally:


root@mail-nihilism:~# wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/LukeSmithxyz/emailwiz/master/emailwiz.sh -O emailwiz.sh
--2022-12-08 13:27:42--  https://raw.githubusercontent.com/LukeSmithxyz/emailwiz/master/emailwiz.sh
Resolving raw.githubusercontent.com (raw.githubusercontent.com)... 185.199.109.133, 185.199.110.133, 185.199.111.133, ...
Connecting to raw.githubusercontent.com (raw.githubusercontent.com)|185.199.109.133|:443... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 13320 (13K) [text/plain]
Saving to: ‘emailwiz.sh’

emailwiz.sh                                                 100%[==========================================================================================================================================>]  13.01K  --.-KB/s    in 0.06s

2022-12-08 13:27:44 (225 KB/s) - ‘emailwiz.sh’ saved [13320/13320]

root@mail-nihilism:~# chmod +x emailwiz.sh
root@mail-nihilism:~# sh emailwiz.sh
	

(putting the TLD instead of mail.nihilism.network here is intentional)

Then we change edit the DNS records as described above:

Here's how you can set it up on a bind9 DNS server:


$TTL    604800
@       IN      SOA     ns1.nihilism.network. nihilist.nihilism.network. (
                 33     ; Serial
             604800     ; Refresh
              86400     ; Retry
            2419200     ; Expire
             604800 )   ; Negative Cache TTL
;
; name servers - NS records
                3600     IN      NS      ns1.nihilism.network.
                3600     IN      NS      ns2.nihilism.network.
                3600     IN      A      23.137.250.141
                3600     IN      AAAA      fe80::216:3eff:fe6c:c335

; mail-gw services
@                                       IN MX      0 mail.nihilism.network.
nihilism.network.                       IN TXT     "v=spf1 mx a:mail.nihilism.network -all"
mail.nihilism.network.                  IN A       23.137.250.140
mail._domainkey.nihilism.network.       IN TXT     (
                                                "v=DKIM1; k=rsa; p=MIIBIjANBgkqhkiG9w0BAQEFAAOCAQ8AMIIBCgKCAQEAu94n6zyhzWLZZrgvRq5HrSAh29TRi"
                                                "jw6AXzFoJeahRPoAnJ3njOfOgbCzxUsVNO1L2+NX2P5iZMkdiVtB7rE71wUutegAb0wCDY5k5RNLUlAThxdlou0ro37H"
                                                "SWK5GRAcEFKm1iab63uTtAXtIvZDPLYMxZMIUq4osxYEgAXY4BCzFBCyfohvr+eGd/kPbfOC9f7jrBnFiOVllnB+yPQKe"
                                                "XwPeVlPrw68muFiVg4vWfMMzayINQgC12d73hKVZIwD8T6V9Kznv0dPi929CDWns2alU2dZypVSHxWm3BZyb4SCobdrFNW"
                                                "xfzb1dz7n6/ms5u0EVAKU9ufGOgS4A70oQIDAQAB")
_dmarc.nihilism.network.                IN TXT     "v=DMARC1; p=reject; rua=mailto:dmarc@nihilism.network; fo=1"

[...]

Please note that on average the DNS records need 1-2 days to propagate fully throughout the world. So be patient once you've made the changes. Also note the DKIM record is on multiple lines, that's because there is a length limit that bind9 has for some reason, so above is how i managed to get around that restriction.

Then we add our first user:


root@mail-nihilism:~#  useradd -G mail -m nihilist
useradd: user 'nihilist' already exists
root@mail-nihilism:~# id nihilist
uid=1000(nihilist) gid=1000(nihilist) groups=1000(nihilist),24(cdrom),25(floppy),29(audio),30(dip),44(video),46(plugdev),108(netdev)
root@mail-nihilism:~# passwd nihilist
New password:
Retype new password:
passwd: password updated successfully

root@mail:~# apt install nmap -y

root@mail-nihilism:~# nmap 127.0.0.1
Starting Nmap 7.80 ( https://nmap.org ) at 2022-12-08 13:49 CST
Nmap scan report for localhost (127.0.0.1)
Host is up (0.000026s latency).
Not shown: 989 closed ports
PORT     STATE SERVICE
22/tcp   open  ssh
25/tcp   open  smtp
80/tcp   open  http
143/tcp  open  imap
443/tcp  open  https
465/tcp  open  smtps
587/tcp  open  submission
783/tcp  open  spamassassin
993/tcp  open  imaps
9040/tcp open  tor-trans
9050/tcp open  tor-socks

Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 0.27 seconds
root@mail-nihilism:~# nmap 10.0.0.202
Starting Nmap 7.80 ( https://nmap.org ) at 2022-12-08 13:49 CST
Nmap scan report for 10.0.0.202
Host is up (0.000097s latency).
Not shown: 992 closed ports
PORT    STATE SERVICE
22/tcp  open  ssh
25/tcp  open  smtp
80/tcp  open  http
143/tcp open  imap
443/tcp open  https
465/tcp open  smtps
587/tcp open  submission
993/tcp open  imaps
MAC Address: EE:B5:C9:3A:C3:FE (Unknown)

The ports we need are ready to be used locally, so let's login:


[ 10.66.66.2/32 ] [ /dev/pts/38 ] [~]
→ sudo pacman -S thunderbird

[ 10.66.66.2/32 ] [ /dev/pts/38 ] [~]
→ thunderbird
	

Then test it on thunderbird:

And that's it! We managed to connect! now we test if the mail works:

(You probably guessed it, i accessed protonmail via tor to make sure i don't leak any personal info) And sending a mail to the VPS gets properly routed through the openvpn connection which is being sent through tor.

Miscellaneous



If you want to use PGP encryption, you can manually do it in your terminal, please see this tutorial to know how to do it.

However there's a way to do it in thunderbird:

If you don't have one, you can click create a new OpenPGP key, but i have one so i'll just import it:


[ 10.8.0.3/24 ] [ nowhere ] [~]
→ gpg --output ~/.nihilist.privkey --export-secret-keys nihilist@nihilism.network

So from here you can copy your public key and paste it wherever you want, for example on your website, so that the users who want to message you will be able to encrypt their messages. Also add the following settings in thunderbird to automatically encrypt messages you wish to send out:

Now let's test it:

As you can see, by default you don't have the destination's PGP key, so for this first mail we won't encrypt it and see how it looks like on the receiver's end:

Now we see that the receiver got the unencrypted message, with our PGP signature as an attachement. The recipient can now save it, and use it to encrypt his messages with us.


[ 10.8.0.3/24 ] [ nowhere ] [~]
→ gpg --gen-key
gpg (GnuPG) 2.2.40; Copyright (C) 2022 g10 Code GmbH
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.

Note: Use "gpg --full-generate-key" for a full featured key generation dialog.

GnuPG needs to construct a user ID to identify your key.

Real name: nothing
Email address: nothing@void.yt
You selected this USER-ID:
    "nothing <nothing@void.yt>"

Change (N)ame, (E)mail, or (O)kay/(Q)uit? O
We need to generate a lot of random bytes. It is a good idea to perform
some other action (type on the keyboard, move the mouse, utilize the
disks) during the prime generation; this gives the random number
generator a better chance to gain enough entropy.
We need to generate a lot of random bytes. It is a good idea to perform
some other action (type on the keyboard, move the mouse, utilize the
disks) during the prime generation; this gives the random number
generator a better chance to gain enough entropy.
gpg: revocation certificate stored as '/home/nothing/.gnupg/openpgp-revocs.d/95FC37D748FA891A9C33B821CF39FCDC8049F9FE.rev'
public and secret key created and signed.

pub   rsa3072 2022-12-10 [SC] [expires: 2024-12-09]
      95FC37D748FA891A9C33B821CF39FCDC8049F9FE
uid                      nothing <nothing@void.yt>
sub   rsa3072 2022-12-10 [E] [expires: 2024-12-09]

[ 10.8.0.3/24 ] [ nowhere ] [~]
→ gpg --output ~/.nothing.privkey --export-secret-keys nothing@void.yt

Now the user nothing can use his PGP key and import it into thunderbird aswell:

Same as before, now the user nothing also has E2E encryption setup, so let's now send a reply to nihilist but this time encrypted:

And that's it! We managed to setup a mail service, whose origin is unknown from the cloud provider's perspective, and who's able to send and recieve E2EE mails to prevent any unauthorized third-party from seeing the mails content.

Nihilism

Until there is Nothing left.

About nihilist

Donate XMR: 8AUYjhQeG3D5aodJDtqG499N5jXXM71gYKD8LgSsFB9BUV1o7muLv3DXHoydRTK4SZaaUBq4EAUqpZHLrX2VZLH71Jrd9k8


Contact: nihilist@nihilism.network (PGP)